Hooper Leadership Coaching
Accelerating Leaders

Coaching Solution influence

Influencing Decision-makers

Wise and experienced leaders know that decisions made in the meeting are actually made before the meeting. Being able to influence decision-makers before the meeting will make the meeting go much more effectively.

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When I functioned on the executive team of a large organization, I saw how important influential conversations were to the success of a project. Some of my zealous direct reports would bring up a topic in the meeting hoping to get a decision in the meeting. I found those conversations usually took longer and many times were met with opposition. ~Charles Hooper, Jr.

HAVE THESE SITUATIONS HAPPENED TO YOU?

  • You have a complaint about something or someone and you aren’t doing anything about it.

  • You have the opportunity to have more impact but are holding back.

  • People have said you need to be more flexible in conversation and influence.

  • You are frustrated by how hard it is to get things done in your organization.

  • You have good ideas but are not sure how to help others see your point.

When a direct report discussed an issue with me first, we were able to design a strong strategy together. When they brought up the issue in the meeting, the results were noticeably better than the normal “shoot from the hip” approach. ~ Senior Executive

THE BENEFITS OF INFLUENCING OTHERS IN ONE-ON-ONE CONVERSATIONS INCLUDE:

  • Having more influence and impact

  • Knowing that others really heard you and your ideas

  • Enjoying the feeling of achieving your goals

  • Getting things done while strengthening relationships

HERE ARE THE 3 of the 7 STEPS AND A SAMPLING OF QUESTIONS IN THIS TOOL.

Step 1: Set a goal—this is where influence starts.

  • What do you want the person to do, say, think, or feel differently?

  • Be sure that your goal is specific, measurable, and something that can be achieved in one meeting.

Step 3: Choose the best appeal.

  • Left Brain: Use facts, logic, data and information that matter to the person.

  • Right Brain: Use stories, word pictures, and metaphors to connect with the person.

  • Gut: Speaking straight like a negotiation and performance review.

Step 4: Structure your approach.

  • State what you want the other person to do, think, or feel.

  • What will you say to show you have heard and acknowledge their issues?

  • What other appeal can you make in case your first strategy fails to work, or new information emerges that you didn’t consider.

The key to successful leadership today is influence, not authority. ~ Ken Blanchard

Who are you trying to influence and what would success do for you?

If this solution would help you, then take the next step and set up a strategy session so we can discuss your situation.